Friday, May 18, 2018

Intel details first 10nm Cannon Lake chip: Coming first to Lenovo Ideapad 330

Intel posts a detailed spec of its first 10nm-process Cannon Lake chip, which will feature in Lenovo's Ideapad 330.


Intel's long-delayed 10nm processors will make their first appearance in a Lenovo Ideapad 330, with the company now detailing the initial chip's specs in its online database.

Intel initially planned to release 10nm processors in 2015 but as it revealed in its Q1 earnings report in April, it was currently only shipping 10nm product in low volumes, while pushing back higher-volume production from the second half of 2018 to some point in 2019.

The Lenovo Ideapad 330 with Intel's 10nm chip was spotted by Computerbase.de on China's JD.com and includes the Core i3-8121U CPU, as well as 4GB RAM and 500GB HDD.

The CPU is based on Intel's Cannon Lake architecture but, instead of integrated graphics as might be expected from a mobile processor, it includes AMD's RX540 graphics.

Intel has now also published details about the Core i3-8121U CPU on its ARK catalog, which confirms it is a Cannon Lake 10nm process chip, classified as an 8th-generation i3 processor as are some of the current brand chips built on Intel's 14nm process, such as Kaby Lake and Coffee Lake.

The specs sheet also reveals that it cycles at 2.2GHz or 3.2GHz with Intel's Turbo Boost. The chip features two cores and four threads. It also has 4MB of smart cache, supports up to 32GB memory, and can support LPDDR4X or Low Power DDR4X.

Intel says it has a maximum memory bandwidth of 41.6 GB/s. As PCWorld points out, one notable edge over the recently launched 8th generation Kaby Lake architecture Core i3-8130U chip is that the 10nm chip has 22 percent higher memory bandwidth.

Intel hasn't included a description of the integrated processor graphics as it does for the Core i3-8130U, suggesting it may need to be combined with other graphics as Lenovo has done in the Ideapad 330 for China.

The chipmaker also hasn't revealed pricing or plans for the wider availability of the chip.


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